The Winter 2013 Issue of Land, Air & Water is Now Available

The cover features an Eastern screech owl photographed in Nelson County by Todd Hendricks, who works in the Division of Waste Management.
The cover features an Eastern screech owl photographed in Nelson County by Todd Hendricks, who works in the Division of Waste Management.

The winter 2013 issue of Land, Air & Water is now available for download at http://eec.ky.gov/Pages/LandAirWater.aspx. This issue highlights the following articles:

  • The peril of bats – Bats are the primary predators of night-flying insects, and they also play key roles in our ecosystems.  Beginning on page 2, learn about two new threats to the bat population, including a disease that has killed more than 5.5 million bats in eastern North America.  The disease has now spread to three counties in Kentucky.
  • Air quality success – The air we breathe has improved significantly in the last 40 years since passage of the Clean Air Act. Learn what Kentucky has done, beginning on page 5, which has resulted in positive impacts to public health and air quality.
  • Maxey Flats: The Final Closure Period – DEP is wrapping up the final stages of one of the biggest cleanup projects in its history. This month, it is anticipated that an engineering firm will be selected to begin work on the design of a final cap that will cover the hazardous waste site where millions of cubic feet of low-level radioactive and hazardous waste are buried. On page 13, read about our employees who monitor the site and what is expected in the coming years.
  • New forest fire reporting system – Division of Forestry employees are now using an internal system that helps them identify and map forest fires in “real” time. On page 18, read how the web-based system increases the efficiency of collecting and reporting information about wildfires and also helps our firefighters know more about the area’s terrain and access roads—all critical factors in fighting wildland fires.

This issue highlights brownfields becoming assets to society, abandoned landfills, energy-efficient schools in Kentucky and additions to protected lands. The stories provided in each issue share the work and progress that our cabinet employees make in preserving our state’s air, land and water resources.

Advertisements