The Summer issue of Land, Air & Water is now available online

The cover features Paintsville Lake in Johnson County, photographed by J. Hamon, who works in the Department for Natural Resources.
The cover features Paintsville Lake in Johnson County, photographed by J. Hamon, who works in the Department for Natural Resources.

The summer 2013 issue is now available for download at http://eec.ky.gov/Pages/LandAirWater.aspx

This issue highlights the following articles:

  • Recycling equipment upgrade – The Division of Waste Management’s Kentucky Government Recycling Section recently upgraded its equipment at its paper processing facility in Frankfort.  White paper, mixed office paper, newsprint and corrugated cardboard are collected from your offices each week and processed at the facility.  The money collected from the sale of the recyclables is used to support the operation.  Read about the cabinet’s recycling program and its new equipment on Page 2.
  • Encouraging property re-use – Under the new provisions of House Bill 465, the state can now provide peace-of-mind assurances to prospective buyers who want to redevelop properties that may have environmental cleanup issues.  On Page 3, read how the Department for Environmental Protection worked with the Cambron family to purchase a Versailles property for their family-owned business.
  • Energy awareness – The Department for Energy Development and Independence helped to launch a program that aids Kentucky businesses and families in evaluating energy usage through energy assessments.  On Page 4, read how an extension agent in Fayette County helps families make informed energy-wise decisions in their homes and also how she helped her own county extension building staff save thousands by switching to high-efficiency lighting.
  • Dead zone in the Gulf – Although we are hundreds of miles away from the Gulf of Mexico, nutrients (such as nitrogen and phosphorus) that are released into our local waterways can eventually make it to the Gulf via various tributaries and rivers.  Beginning on Page 9 read how the over-enrichment of nutrients is affecting the Gulf, how these “dead zones” can disrupt ecosystems and what our state is doing to reduce its nutrient loading.

The summer issue also highlights EPA’s new Tier 3 vehicle standards that will help to remove harmful motor emissions, improving air quality on Page 1;  how the members of the KY EXCEL program have continued to improve the state’s environmental future, along with a list of one-year project results on Page 6; and reorganization changes to the Kentucky Division of Forestry on Page 18, in addition to numerous awards presented during the past few months.

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