Work Continues in Neighborhood Superfund Cleanup

Due to recent rainfall, swamp mats must be used by crews to access wet yards with heavy equipment and continue cleanup work. Photo: Virginia Lewis.
Due to recent rainfall, swamp mats must be used by crews to access wet yards with heavy equipment and continue cleanup work. Photo: Virginia Lewis.

Despite freezing temperatures, heavy rainfall, and soaked ground, the crews continue cleanup work in the Park Hill neighborhood in Louisville, Ky.

Since the cleanup began on Aug. 19, 54 residential properties have been excavated and backfilled with clean soil and almost all have new sod or seed. More access agreements have been received, bringing the total number of properties allowing cleanup to 68.

Every effort is being made to complete work on the remaining yards by the end of this year.

At the same time yards are being cleaned up, the Commonwealth is in discussions with potentially responsible parties regarding their development of a plan for the investigation of the former Black Leaf Chemical property. It is anticipated that the plan will be completed by the end of the year and the on-site investigation will be implemented by spring 2014.

A Louisville media crew films from the alley as heavy equipment removes soil from a nearby yard. The dump truck at the end of the alley waits for the new load of dirt. Photo: Virginia Lewis.

The Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection (DEP) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are committed to
protecting the residents and others in the Park Hill community and keeping
them informed as the work progresses. Current project information is continually being shared with residents, community groups, and media.

Anyone with questions or concerns is encouraged to contact Kentucky Division of Waste Management staff Tim Hubbard or Sheri Adkins at 502‐564‐6716. For properties being cleaned up by EPA, contact Art Smith, EPA on-scene coordinator, at 502‐582‐5161.

In this cleanup, the DEP and EPA are replacing soil and sod in 68 yards in Louisville, as an important step in reducing residents’ exposure to contamination. These yards border a superfund site, the former Black Leaf Chemical property. Read all DEP posts related to this cleanup here.

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