Recreational Advisory for Cannelton and McAlpine pools of Ohio River lifted after results below advisory level

The Kentucky Division of Water (DOW) and the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH) are removing the recreational use advisory for the Cannelton and McAlpine pools of the Ohio River, effective immediately. Results from recent samplings by DOW indicate the levels of microcystin toxin occurring in this area of the river are below the advisory threshold for recreating in the water.

The recreational advisory issued for this section of the river above the Cannelton Locks and Dam to the Markland Lock and Dam on Sept. 18, 2015, was prompted by the presence of harmful algal blooms (HABs) on the river. The advisory was issued when water sampling results showed levels above the DOW recreational threshold of 20 parts per billion of microcystin toxins. The recreational advisory remains from the Markland Lock and Dam to the West Virginia state line. The DOW and DPH are continuing to coordinate with states along the river and the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO) to monitor conditions on the Ohio River. Continue reading “Recreational Advisory for Cannelton and McAlpine pools of Ohio River lifted after results below advisory level”

Harmful Algal Bloom recreational advisory issued for the Ohio River and tributaries

Advisory area stretches from W. Va. Line to Markland Dam

The Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW) and the Kentucky Department for Public Health (KDPH) are re-issuing a harmful algal bloom (HAB) recreational advisory for the Ohio River, extending the advisory downstream from the West Virginia state line to the Markland Dam located 3.5 miles downstream from Warsaw, Ky.

HAB

Water swallowed during recreational activities in this body of water may increase the risk of gastrointestinal symptoms such as stomach pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Skin, eye and throat irritation and/or breathing difficulties may also occur after contact. Continue reading “Harmful Algal Bloom recreational advisory issued for the Ohio River and tributaries”

Division of Water to monitor Kentucky’s waters for Harmful Algal Blooms

HAB on Lake Reba in Madison County in 2014. Division of Water photo
HAB on Lake Reba in Madison County in 2014. Division of Water photo

As warm weather arrives, recreational use of Kentucky’s waterways increases. For the last few years, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the Kentucky Division of Water (DOW) have monitored the state’s water for algal blooms.

Algal blooms, and the algae that form them, occur naturally in the water. Factors promoting algal growth include a combination of sunlight, warm water temperatures, low turbulence, and elevated nutrient levels of phosphorus and nitrogen. These nutrients can come from many sources including crops, pastures, and urban and industrial areas. The resulting harmful algal blooms, or HABs, are likely the result of heavy spring rains that wash the excess nutrients into the lakes. Continue reading “Division of Water to monitor Kentucky’s waters for Harmful Algal Blooms”

Department for Environmental Protection develops Fact Sheets about Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)

Fact Sheets discuss causes and effects, strategies for managing and treating of HABs

The occurrence of harmful algal blooms in the United States became national news this August when Toledo, Ohio’s public water system and its 400,000+ customers were without water for several days as a result of a harmful algal bloom. In 2013 and 2014, monitoring of Kentucky lakes by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the Kentucky Division of Water (DOW) confirmed the presence of algal blooms.

Some of these blooms were present at levels exceeding the World Health Organization recommended safety thresholds and were considered potentially harmful. As the occurrence of HABs becomes more prevalent and a bigger part of environmental and public health discussion, the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection has developed Fact Sheets that provide background on what HABs are, what causes HABs, and the problems and effects associated with HABs including recreational concerns, water treatment challenges and public health impacts. Continue reading “Department for Environmental Protection develops Fact Sheets about Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)”

Register for the Fall 2014 Hypoxia Task Force Public Meeting & Webcast!

The Kentucky Division of Water is one of 12 Mississippi River basin states that have developed or are developing a Nutrient Reduction Strategy to address nutrient impairments and the effects of nutrients. The Mississippi River\Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force, which includes the Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection, will be holding a public meeting in Godfrey, Illinois on Tuesday October 21, 2014.  Kentucky stakeholders are invited to participate in person or via webcast. Continue reading “Register for the Fall 2014 Hypoxia Task Force Public Meeting & Webcast!”

Potentially Harmful algal blooms identified in several Kentucky lakes

Division of Water advises lake visitors to make informed decisions

The Kentucky Division of Water (DOW) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) have confirmed the presence of potentially harmful algal blooms (HABs), or cyanobacteria at levels exceeding recommended safety thresholds at several lakes in Kentucky. These lakes include Barren River Lake, Nolin Reservoir, Green River Lake, Rough River Lake, Taylorsville Lake and Greenbriar Creek Reservoir in Montgomery County. Cell counts at one site at Taylorsville Lake exceeded 1,000,000 cells/ml. The World Health Organization has determined that “moderate probability of experiencing adverse health effects” exists when cyanobacteria cell counts exceed 100,000 cells/ml. The Department of Public Health, the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Department of Parks, and other stakeholders have been informed of these conditions.

These lakes remain open to the public. Visitors should be aware of the potential health issues and take precautions.

The following guidelines are recommended to avoid exposure to HABs: Continue reading “Potentially Harmful algal blooms identified in several Kentucky lakes”

Harmful algal blooms found at four more Kentucky lakes

Division of Water advises lake visitors to make informed decisions

The Kentucky Division of Water (DOW) has confirmed the presence of harmful algal blooms (HABs), or cyanaobacteria, levels exceeding recommended safety thresholds at four lakes in central Kentucky. They include Beaver Lake in Anderson County, Guist Creek Lake in Shelby County, Lake Reba in Madison County and Willisburg Lake in Washington County.

The World Health Organization has established a “cautionary” threshold of cyanobacteria cell concentrations at 100,000 cells per milliliter (/ml). The four Kentucky lakes — identified in the table below — were found to exceed this threshold during two rounds of testing by DOW.

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Kentucky lakes investigation – HAB cell counts

Continue reading “Harmful algal blooms found at four more Kentucky lakes”