Drinking Water Treatment Facilities Recognized

The Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet (EEC) recognized Kentucky drinking water treatment facilities that achieved optimization goals even more stringent than those required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). By doing so, these facilities have voluntarily met the goals of the Area-Wide Optimization Program (AWOP) in 2021.

Drinking water systems utilize AWOP tools and methods to increase protection for consumers. In particular, AWOP emphasizes the reduction of turbidity and disinfection by-products (DBPs). Turbidity, or cloudiness, is a measurement of particles in water including soil, algae, bacteria, viruses, organic material, and other substances. DBPs are compounds that form when chlorine (used for disinfection) reacts with organic material in water.

“Forty-six systems who voluntarily participated in the AWOP exceeded their goals, producing water that goes above and beyond federal regulations for drinking water,” said Alicia Jacobs, the Division of Water Drinking Water branch manager. “As both a regulator and a citizen of the Commonwealth, I appreciate the commitment these water facilities have towards protecting the health of the public by working to exceed Safe Drinking Water Act requirements.”

Two drinking water treatment plants received the AWOP Champion Award, which recognizes water systems that achieved AWOP standards for three years in a row, taking into account the high level of turbidity optimization achieved.

  • Lawrenceburg Water and Sewer Department received the 2021 Champion Award for large systems (designed to treat 3 million or more gallons of water per day).
  • Monroe County Water District received the 2021 Champion Award for small systems (designed to treat less than 3 million gallons of water per day).

Sixteen AWOP drinking water plants earned special recognition for achieving AWOP turbidity goals 100 percent of the time in 2021:

  • Columbia / Adair County Water Commission
  • Hardin County Water District #2 Plant A
  • Hopkinsville Water Environment Authority
  • Jackson County Water Association
  • Jamestown Municipal Water Works
  • Kentucky American Water Plant C
  • Kentucky State Penitentiary
  • Laurel County Water District #2
  • Lawrenceburg Water And Sewer Department
  • Liberty Water Works
  • London Utility Commission
  • Louisa Water Department
  • Madisonville Light and Water
  • Monroe County Water District
  • Providence Water Works
  • Webster County Water District

Forty-four drinking water plants received a certificate for meeting AWOP turbidity goals and criteria in 2021:

  • Barbourville Water & Electric
  • Blue Grass Army Depot
  • Booneville Water
  • Bullock Pen Water District
  • Burkesville Water Works
  • Cave Run Regional Water Commission
  • Central City Water & Sewer
  • Columbia/Adair County Water Commission
  • Danville City Water Works
  • Falmouth Water Department
  • Franklin Water Works
  • Glasgow Water Company – Plants A & B
  • Hardin County Water District No. 2 – Plants A & B
  • Hartford Municipal Water Works
  • Hodgenville Water Works
  • Hopkinsville Water Environment Authority
  • Jackson County Water Association
  • Jackson Municipal Water Works
  • Jamestown Municipal Water Works
  • Jenkins Water System
  • Kentucky American – Plant C
  • Kentucky State Penitentiary
  • Knox County Utility Commission
  • Laurel County Water District No. 2
  • Lawrenceburg Water & Sewer Department
  • Lebanon Water Works Company Inc.
  • Liberty Water Works
  • Logan Todd Regional Water Commission
  • London Utility Commission
  • Louisa Water Department
  • Madisonville Light & Water
  • McCreary County Water District – Plants A & B
  • Monroe County Water District
  • Paducah Water Works
  • Princeton Water & Sewer Commission
  • Providence Water Works
  • Rattlesnake Ridge Water District
  • Water Services Corporation of KY, Middlesboro
  • Webster County Water District
  • Williamsburg Water Department
  • Wood Creek Water District

Ten drinking water systems received a certificate for meeting AWOP DBP goals and criteria in 2021:

  • Campbellsville Municipal Water
  • Cynthiana Municipal Water Works
  • Danville City Water Works
  • Franklin Water Works
  • Glasgow Water Company – Plant A and B
  • Hardin County Water District #2 – Plant A and B
  • Paducah Water Works
  • Princeton Water and Sewer Commission

For additional information about AWOP visit https://tinyurl.com/KYAWOP  or contact Jackie Logsdon at jackie.logsdon@ky.gov or 502-764-1209.

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Kentucky Soil and Water Conservation Commission  to Meet July 26

Videoconference will begin at 9 a.m.

FRANKFORT, Ky. (July 19, 2022) – The Kentucky Soil and Water Conservation Commission will hold a meeting July 26 at 9 a.m. Eastern time. This meeting will be held by videoconference.

Anyone who wants to attend virtually can follow this link (https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84553623580?pwd=NTFSMUZCak5tVG9GcG5YcTN6eFFaUT09) or join with Zoom meeting ID 845 5362 3580 and password SWCC.

The July 26 meeting will be streamed live at 300 Sower Boulevard in Frankfort, conference room 216, for those who wish to view the meeting and do not have access.

If you have questions, please contact Johnna McHugh at 502-782-6703.

AGENDA

  1. Call to order and introductions
  2. Minutes of the last meeting
  3. Agency reports
  4. Correspondence
  5. Equipment report
  6. Approval of vacancy petitions and incentive per diem
  7. Agriculture District Program
  8. Old business
  9. New business
  10. Adjourn

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Kentucky Drinking Water and Clean Water Advisory Council to Meet June 14

FRANKFORT, Ky. (June 2, 2022) – The next meeting of the Drinking Water and Clean Water Advisory Council will be on Tuesday, June 14 at 10 a.m. 

To join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone: https://meet.goto.com/503702229

You can also dial in using your phone. (For supported devices, tap a one-touch number below to join instantly.)

United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 – One-touch: tel:+15713173122,,503702229#

Access Code: 503-702-229

For assistance with meeting access, please contact Kim Greenidge at Kim.Greenidge@ky.gov or (502) 782-6630

Agenda (Subject to change)

Welcome and opening remarks – Carey Johnson, director, Division of Water

General remarks – John Lyons, deputy secretary, Energy & Environment Cabinet

Discussion items – Carey Johnson, director, Division of Water

Division of Water and Division of Enforcement focus items: 

  • Natalie Bruner, director, Division of Enforcement
  • John Webb, assistant director, Division of Water
  • PFAS update

Committee reports – Carey Johnson, director, Division of Water

  • Lead in drinking water
  • Compliance and regulations
  • Nutrients
  • Small systems

Announcements – facilitated by Carey Johnson, DOW Director 

DWAC/CWAC tentative meeting schedule for 2022 (2nd Tuesday of the last month of the quarter): September 13, and December 13.

Adjourn

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Water Recreation Tips Issued from Public Health, Division of Water

FRANKFORT, Ky. (May 27, 2022) – With summer approaching, the Kentucky Division of Water (DOW) and the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH) offer these safety tips to help Kentuckians enjoy the many rivers, lakes and creeks in which to boat, fish, swim, canoe or otherwise enjoy our abundant water resources.

Despite many water quality improvements, there is the potential for human health risks in any body of water.  By using common sense, your risks of experiencing water-derived health issues can be greatly decreased.

DOW and DPH recommend that the public:

  1. Avoid ingesting or inhaling the water.
  2. Thoroughly clean hands and other areas that have come in contact with the water.
  3. Avoid allowing open wounds to have direct contact with the water.
  4. Avoid areas where swimming or harmful algal bloom (HAB) advisories have been issued.
  5. Avoid water with obvious odors or surface scums.
  6. Avoid getting in water after heavy rainfall, especially in dense residential, urban and agricultural areas.
  7. Avoid areas below wastewater treatment facility outfalls, animal feedlots, straight pipes or other obvious sources of pollution.
  8. Restrict pets and livestock from drinking the water if a bright green or blue-green surface scum is present.

More information concerning the quality of Kentucky’s water resources such as advisories or impairments can be found here.

If you experience symptoms, such as gastro-intestinal upset or rash, after recreation in natural waters, such as streams, rivers or lakes, consult your physician or call your local health department.

For more information on healthy swimming in all water bodies, visit https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/swimming/.

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Martin County Water District Workgroup to Meet June 8

Video conference will start at 1 p.m.

FRANKFORT, Ky. (May 25, 2022) – The Martin County Water District Workgroup will be meeting by videoconference on June 8, 2022 from 1 – 3 p.m. Eastern time. If you have questions about connecting to the videoconference, please contact Kim Greenidge at 502-782-6630.

Please join the meeting from a computer, tablet or smartphone.

https://meet.goto.com/883374973

You can also dial in using a phone. (For supported devices, tap a one-touch number below to join instantly.)

United States: +1 (571) 317-3122 – One-touch: tel:+15713173122,,883374973#

Access Code: 883-374-973

Agenda

  • Welcome and opening remarks – EEC Deputy Secretary John Lyons
  • Introductions and announcements – DOW Director Carey Johnson
  • Update of MCWD operations – Alliance Water Resources Division Manager Craig Miller
    1. Projects update
  • Update from the Division of Water – Director Carey Johnson
  • Update from the Public Service Commission – Executive Director Linda Bridwell
  • Open discussion – Facilitated by Carey Johnson
  • Future workgroup meeting proposed date and time
    1. August 31, 2022, 1- 3 p.m.
  • Adjourn

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Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Authority to Meet May 5

Meeting begins at 9:30 a.m.

FRANKFORT, Ky. (April 28, 2022) – The Kentucky Agriculture Water Quality Authority will hold its regular spring meeting on May 5 at 9:30 a.m. Central time. The meeting will be held at authority member Joseph Sisk’s farm (6493 Sisk Road, in Hopkinsville). If you have questions, please contact Johnna McHugh at 502-782-6703.

AGENDA

  • Welcome
  • Farm tour
  • Lunch
  • Introduction of guests
  • Swearing in of new members
  • Approval of minutes
  • Old business
  • New business
    • Subcommittee reports
      • KASMC
      • Farmstead
      • Pesticides, fertilizers and other agriculture chemicals
      • Livestock and poultry
      • Crops
      • Silviculture
      • Education and outreach
    • Quarterly update of AWQA related violations
    • Updates from members
  • Adjourn

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Division of Water Seeks Comment

Draft report addresses 35 bacteria-impaired streams in Cumberland River and Tennessee River basins, and minor Mississippi River tributaries

FRANKFORT, Ky. (March 9, 2022) – The Division of Water is seeking public comment through April 11, 2022 on a draft report that addresses bacteria-impaired streams within the Cumberland River and Tennessee River basins, and minor Mississippi River tributaries. This Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) report provides critical information needed to restore water quality in these waters.

To read the draft report and find out how to comment, visit the Division of Water website at https://eec.ky.gov/Environmental-Protection/Water/Pages/Water-Public-Notices-and-Hearings.aspx. To learn more about how TMDLs help to support water quality restoration, visit the TMDL program website at https://eec.ky.gov/Environmental-Protection/Water/Protection/TMDL/Pages/default.aspx.

“Total Maximum Daily Load” refers to the amount of a pollutant a water body can receive and still meet water quality standards. Standards for E. coli and fecal coliform bacteria are intended to protect the health of those using surface waters for swimming, wading, boating, and other recreation.

The Clean Water Act requires each state to periodically identify specific waters where standards are not being met and then to develop a TMDL for the pollutants not meeting standards.  TMDL reports are made available to the public for review and comment prior to submission to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for approval.

The new report will complete TMDLs for 35 impaired stream segments in the following counties: Ballard, Carlisle, Christian, Fulton, Graves, Hickman, Knox, Laurel, Logan, Marshall, McCracken, McCreary, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Simpson, Todd, Trigg, and Whitley.

The report is part of the Kentucky Statewide Bacteria TMDL, an ongoing effort which will complete TMDLs for more than 350 stream segments by the end of 2022. 

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