Taste/odor concerns of drinking water in Frankfort

The Division of Water has received numerous comments/complaints regarding the recent taste and odor issues with the drinking water in Frankfort. I have spoken with officials from the Frankfort Plant Board and they too are being inundated with complaints, as well as experiencing the results of the social media attention.

The taste and odor issues are the result of compounds occurring in the source water. The very low flows and high temperatures, as well as excess nutrients in the Kentucky River are resulting in very significant occurrences of algae. The offending compounds are Geosmin and MIB (2-Methylisoborneol). Geosmin is an organic compound with a distinct earthy flavor and aroma produced by certain bacteria, and is responsible for the earthy taste of beetroots. MIB is an organic chemical with a strong odor. Some algae and bacteria produce MIB together with other odorous chemicals such as geosmin. These compounds produce a musty or earthy odor that can be quite strong if an algal bloom is present. These chemicals can be smelled at very low levels, in the parts-per-trillion range (ppt range), and are responsible for many “taste and odor” issues in drinking water treatment and distribution.

There is no public health issue associated with the occurrence of these compounds in drinking water. This condition is strictly an aesthetics (taste and odor) issue, and, as such, is not a non-compliant condition.

Contrary to reports on some social media outlets, these taste and odor issues are not the result of black mold occurring in the distribution system.

The taste and odors can be effectively removed by carbon filters such as a Brita or a standard refrigerator filter.

Frankfort Plant Board is working diligently, tweaking their treatment process to optimize the removal and neutralization of these compounds, including feeding activated carbon in the treatment process.

Increased flows in the Kentucky River will help ameliorate the issues. We are anticipating that at least one of the Corps projects will begin releasing water soon to get to winter pool which could improve flow through rates in the downstream pools. The flow at Lock and Dam #7 has been below the crest and the Kentucky River Authority is working with a power producer to address that issue.

We need rain, cooler weather, less sunlight, and greater flow in the river.

Peter T. Goodmann, Director of the Division of Water

 

Advertisements

Gov. Bevin, State and Local Officials Celebrate $5.2 Million in Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Pilot Grants for Floyd County

FRANKFORT, KY. (Sept. 11, 2019) – Gov. Matt Bevin today joined state and local officials in Eastern Kentucky to celebrate over $5.2 million in funding for economic development projects in Floyd County.

The projects were selected for grants through the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet’s (EEC) Division of Abandoned Mine Lands, as part of the Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Pilot program to revitalize the coalfields in Kentucky’s Appalachian region.

The city of Prestonsburg was selected to receive $185,000 to do planning and feasibility studies to develop the Levisa and Russell Forks as a Blue Water Trail.

The Kentucky Coal Heritage Trail was selected to receive $225,000 to develop a comprehensive inventory of coal-related buildings, and vacant historic sites in the 20 ARC coal counties of Southeast Kentucky. Once completed, the inventory will help launch reclamation efforts and tourism activities related to the rich coal mining heritage of the region.

Southern Water and Sewer District was selected to receive $1.5 million to replace water meters serving its residential and commercial customers, install a radio read metering system, and replace and install additional master meters throughout the system.

The three projects were first unveiled Friday at the SOAR Summit in Pikeville, along with two additional AML Pilot grants for the Eastern Kentucky Business Park, which serves Floyd, Jackson, Magoffin, Martin and Pike Counties. The grants for the business park total $3.37 million and will boost business recruitment efforts and economic development for the five counties.

“The AML Pilot grants announced for Floyd County will have a ripple effect across the region,” said Gov. Bevin. “These investments range from infrastructure improvement to tourism development, and I am confident that each will have a positive impact for the community. We are grateful to Congressman Rogers for his continued strong partnership as we work together to spur job creation and increased economic growth in Eastern Kentucky.”

“The AML Pilot Program allows us to focus funding where it’s needed the most in each county, to address pressing needs for infrastructure improvements, tourism enhancements, workforce training, and the like. We are revitalizing Southern and Eastern Kentucky from every corner to create more jobs and a brighter future in our region,” said Congressman Rogers, who championed the AML Pilot Program and secured $105 million in federal funding for Kentucky since 2016, alongside U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell (R-KY).

Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet Secretary Charles Snavely said the projects will bring significant economic development and tourism dollars to the region. “We are pleased to be part of this revitalization,” Secretary Snavely said.

The AML Pilot Program, funded through OSMRE, is a program administered by the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Division of Abandoned Mine Lands with assistance from the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development, the Department for Local Government, and the SOAR Initiative in Eastern Kentucky.

###

Air Permitting and Compliance Workshop

Do you have questions about air quality regulations? Want to know what to expect when an inspector visits your facility? The Division of Compliance Assistance, in partnership with the Division for Air Quality, is hosting a workshop to help regulated facilities understand and comply with air quality regulations. The workshop will be held at the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Office in Frankfort on September 12, 2019.

This introductory-level, one-day workshop will help those new to air permitting understand the basics, including how to conduct an air assessment, calculate potential emissions, maintain record keeping and complete permit-required reports. Attendees will participate in an interactive activity to apply their learning and practice basic emission calculations. The full agenda is available online here.

The workshop will be beneficial for environmental or facility managers, small business owners, consultants, educational institutions, health and safety professionals, economic development professionals or anyone who needs an overview of environmental permits.

General admission is $40, and KY EXCEL members can register for $20. To register, please visit http://dca.ticketleap.com/. Registration closes September 11. If you have question about this event, contact Derek Bozzell at 502-782-6324 or derek.bozzell@ky.gov.

##

Gov. Bevin, Congressman Rogers Celebrate More than $5 Million in Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Pilot Grants for Knott, Perry and Breathitt Counties

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Sept. 7, 2019) – Gov. Matt Bevin today joined Congressman Harold “Hal” Rogers (KY-05), Kentucky Energy & Environment Cabinet (EEC) Secretary Charles Snavely and other state and local officials in Eastern Kentucky to celebrate $5.09 million in funding for three economic development projects in Knott, Perry, and Breathitt counties.

The projects were selected for grants through the EEC’s Division of Abandoned Mine Lands, as part of the 2018 and 2019 Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Pilot program to help revitalize the coalfields in Kentucky’s Appalachian region.

The USA Drone Port in Perry and Knott counties was selected to receive a $1.5 million 2018 AML Pilot grant to construct a cutting-edge, indoor drone flight-testing facility, along with peripheral infrastructure.

The 20,000-square-foot facility will enable all-weather drone research and development and make available drone testing 24 hours a day to private industry, government, and educational institutions. The grant has been submitted to the U.S. Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) for approval.

The USA Drone Port also has been selected to receive a $743,000 2019 AML Pilot grant to extend its sewer collection system while adding water service to the site.

Two other projects were selected to receive funds from the 2019 AML Pilot program.

Mine Made Adventures in Knott County was selected to receive $1.5 million to expand and develop the park. The project will include campground sites, cabins, and a multi-use building. The newly developed park will serve as a trailhead for hundreds of miles of interconnected, multi-purpose trails.

The South Fork Elk View Campground in Breathitt County was selected to receive $1.345 million to continue development of the campground. The area will include cabins, primitive tent sites, RV hook-ups, on-site utilities, landscaping, a camp store, bath house, vehicle wash station, and a playground.

“I am pleased to join Congressman Rogers today in announcing more than $5 million for three important economic development projects in Eastern Kentucky,” said Gov. Bevin. “These AML Pilot Program investments will provide significant enhancements to Knott/Perry County’s cutting-edge USA Drone Port, Knott County’s exciting Mine Made Adventure Park, and Breathitt County’s scenic South Fork Elk View Campground. We are grateful to Congressman Rogers, who is a strong partner in bringing vital jobs, economic opportunity and tourism development to our Appalachian region.”

“The AML Pilot Program allows us to focus funding where it’s needed the most in each county, to address pressing needs for infrastructure improvements, tourism enhancements, workforce training, and the like. We are revitalizing Southern and Eastern Kentucky from every corner to create more jobs and a brighter future in our region,” said Congressman Rogers, who championed the AML Pilot Program and secured $105 million in federal funding for Kentucky since 2016, alongside U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell (R-KY).

Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet Secretary Charles Snavely said the projects will bring business and tourism dollars to the region. “We are glad we can assist these terrific projects,” Sec. Snavely said.

The AML Pilot Program, funded through OSMRE, is a program administered by the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Division of Abandoned Mine Lands with assistance from the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development, the Department for Local Government, and the SOAR Initiative in Eastern Kentucky.

The projects were first unveiled Friday at the SOAR Summit in Pikeville.

####

Boil Water Advisory Continues in Portions of Peaks Mill Water District

FRANKFORT (Sept. 6, 2019) – The Kentucky Division of Water is working with the Peaks Mill Water District due to a continuing boil water advisory in the district as a result of some parts of the system not having the required minimum disinfectant residual required by Kentucky state regulations.

A boil water advisory is still in effect for some homes in these areas: Peaks Mill Road from 6700 Peaks Mill Rd. to Stillhouse Hollow, all of Stillhouse Hollow Road and all of Indian Gap Rd. 3500 and above on Union Ridge, All of: Camp Pleasant, Mt. Vernon Road, Mt Vernon Ridge, Gregory Woods, Kays Branch, King Lane, Teresita, Harmony, Payton Ridge, Cedar Road, and Oakland/Sharp Road.

The district is struggling to maintain disinfectant residual in those areas possibly due to water age and turnover.  The disinfectant residual in Peaks Mill water typically lasts for several days, but it does degrade over time especially with warmer temperatures.  Due to the small number of customers spread out in those areas, the water doesn’t always get used quickly enough in those areas to prevent the residuals from dropping to below the minimum requirements.

Flushing out the lines at water hydrants can help with moving water but even with the flushing, the use of water is currently not sufficient to turn over water in the water lines in areas under a boil water advisory.  In addition to flushing, Peaks Mill has begun boosting disinfectant in the system by feeding it into the main water line in the area in an attempt to improve disinfectant residuals.

Division of Water is currently working with Peaks Mill to determine if other factors are contributing to the loss of disinfectant residuals in the boil water advisory areas.

Water must be at a rolling boil for 3 full minutes before drinking or using to cook until further notice in affected areas. Bottled water is available for those customers still under the boil water advisory. The water is available at 2 locations:

Franklin County Fire Station located at 9091 Owenton Rd. AND

Monterey Fire Station located at 40 Sawdridge Rd., across from Ellis Market. This is a volunteer fire department, please try to pick up before 5:00 pm, 6:00 pm at the latest.

Contact numbers: Larry House 502-209-0023 and Charlie Riddle 502-750-0677.

Mining Death in Hopkins County

Warrior Coal LLC. mine site of accident

FRANKFORT, Ky. (Sept. 6, 2019) – A 39-year-old coal miner passed away Thursday from injuries sustained in an accident, September 5, at a Hopkins County underground coal mine. Jeremy Elder, of Providence, Ky., a miner helper with 15 years of experience, suffered critical injuries at the Cardinal mine in Madisonville, Ky.

Elder, who began his shift at 6:30 a.m., died as a result of a vehicle accident. He was brought to the surface but did not survive his injuries.

The Kentucky Department for Natural Resources, Division of Mine Safety, sent investigators to the site following the afternoon accident. All mining operations were shut down yesterday and production will remain closed today in the accident area.

“Across the Commonwealth, our hearts are broken following the tragic passing of Jeremy Elder on Thursday in Western Kentucky,” said Gov. Bevin. “We ask that all who recognize the healing power of prayer, please join us in remembering his wife, children, friends, and community as they mourn the loss of this hard working man. May we never take for granted the vital work and personal sacrifice of our dedicated miners.”

The Division of Mine Safety last inspected the mine in June, 2019.

“My deepest sympathies go out to the Elder family,” Kentucky Energy and Environment Secretary Charles G. Snavely said. “We are investigating this accident and are determined to do everything that we can to prevent any such future loss of life among miners.”

 

####

Gov. Bevin, Congressman Rogers Announce $34.4 Million in Abandoned Mine Lands Pilot Grants for Economic Development and Job Creation in Eastern Kentucky

14 Eastern Kentucky counties impacted by investments

PIKEVILLE, Ky. (Sept. 6, 2019) – U.S. Rep. Harold “Hal” Rogers (KY-05) and Gov. Matt Bevin today announced 20 grants totaling $34.4 million to spur economic development and job creation in Eastern Kentucky.

Projects impacting 14 counties were selected for grants through the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet’s (EEC) Division of Abandoned Mine Lands, as part of the Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Pilot Program to revitalize the coalfields in Kentucky’s Appalachian region through economic development.

All projects were unveiled at the 2019 Shaping Our Appalachian Region (SOAR) Summit in Pikeville by Gov. Bevin and Congressman Rogers, who has championed $425 million in federal funding for the AML Pilot Program since 2016, alongside U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell (R-KY). $105 million of the program funds have been awarded to Kentucky.

“These grant announcements target the regional scope of SOAR and the importance of collaborating across county boundaries by highlighting the success we can create when we combine federal, state and local resources,” said Congressman Rogers. “We are addressing a broad spectrum of issues through these grants, from advancing healthcare, to enhancing tourism, to improving infrastructure, to creating new jobs. If we are going to shape our future, we must continue to take a holistic approach.”

“I am excited to join Congressman Rogers today in announcing more than $34 million in AML Pilot Program investments for 20 economic development projects across Eastern Kentucky,” said Gov. Bevin. “These funds will assist the region’s communities in providing vital healthcare access, workforce training, infrastructure development, tourism enhancement, and economic opportunity. We are grateful to Congressman Rogers for being a tireless champion and strong partner as we transform Eastern Kentucky’s economy to build a brighter future for our citizens.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that as Leader and a senior member of the Appropriations Committee, he has made funding this program a top priority each year to deliver much-needed federal resources to revitalize this region’s economy and to improve the lives of families in Eastern Kentucky’s coal communities.

“Eastern Kentucky communities hold great potential, and the investments announced today will support families, workers and community institutions throughout this wonderful region,” Senator McConnell said.

Healthcare and job training projects include:

  • Pikeville Medical Center in Pike County was selected to receive $4.78 million for the construction and resources necessary to develop a children’s hospital and pediatric clinic. In addition to creating jobs in the health care industry, the facility will provide regional health care services for over 100,000 children.
  • Leslie County was selected to receive $2.056 million to develop the Leslie County Job Training, Connectivity and TeleWorks program, which will expand internet connectivity and provide training for high demand jobs. The project will connect downtown Hyden to wi-fi service and will expand access to community center in Stinnett and Cutshin to support new job opportunities through TeleWorks.
  • The East Kentucky Advanced Manufacturing Institute, (eKAMI), in Morgan County was selected to receive $3.4 million to expand its outreach from Johnson County to the East Kentucky Correctional Complex at West Liberty. The grant will be used to construct a 20,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art training facility at the correctional complex to retrain prisoners and help them develop skills for a successful reintegration into society.
  • The USA Drone Port in Perry and Knott counties was selected to receive $1.5 million to construct a cutting-edge, indoor drone flight-testing facility. The 20,000-square-foot facility will enable all-weather drone research and development.
  • Hazard Community and Technical College in Perry County was selected to receive $2.5 million to retrofit the existing industrial education building into the Advanced Manufacturing and Construction Center of Excellence in order to provide high-tech, hands-on training in the manufacturing sector. The center will train students in welding, construction, computer aided drafting and design, electricity, machining, tool and die, and HVAC.

Infrastructure improvement projects include:

  • The Martin County Water District will receive $2 million for a new booster pump station, a 250,000-gallon storage tank, and other upgrades to shore up water system failures.
  • The Big Sandy Regional Industrial Authority in Martin County was selected to receive $2 million to construct a build-ready site for a 200,000-square-foot building and to renovate other locations in the Eastern Kentucky Business Park. The project will create one of the most highly marketable industrial park in the coal fields.
  • The International Landing Zone in Martin County was selected to receive $1.37 million to create a multi-user manufacturing facility in an existing 33,000-square-foot facility in the Eastern Kentucky Business Park. The project will provide small-scale, graduated manufacturing space for companies seeking to begin operations until they are ready to expand into their own locations.
  • Southern Water and Sewer District in Floyd County was selected to receive $1.5 million to replace and update water meters serving its residential and commercial customers.
  • Troublesome Creek Environmental Authority in Knott County was selected to receive $743,000 to expand a sewer collection system to the USA Drone Port and to add water service to the site. The project will lay the groundwork for future water service expansion.
  • The city of Paintsville and Johnson County were selected to receive $4 million for construction of a sewer expansion that will free up capacity at the Paintsville Waste Water Treatment Plant by diverting waste to the Honey Branch Wastewater Treatment Plant. The expansion will alleviate the capacity issues at the Paintsville plant and foster economic growth in the city, as well as along the sewer route.

Tourism-related projects include:

  • The city of Beattyville in Lee County was selected to receive $1.25 million to develop a trail head along the Beattyville Coal Seam that will serve as a starting point for hiking and mountain biking. The Beattyville Connect project will develop a town square along with walking paths and historical markers.
  • The city of Prestonsburg in Floyd County was selected to receive $185,000 to do planning and feasibility studies to develop the Levisa and Russell Forks as a Blue Water Trail.
  • EKY Heritage Foundation, Inc. has been selected to receive $3.465 million to develop Thunder Mountain, a world-class, sport-shooting and archery resort park in Letcher County.
  • Impact Outdoor Adventures in Clay County was selected to receive $205,000 that will build a roadway to provide improved access to the Impact Outdoor campground, which hosts year-round events for local youth.
  • The Kentucky Coal Heritage Trail in Floyd County was selected to receive $225,000 to develop a comprehensive inventory of coal-related buildings, and vacant historic sites in the 20 Appalachian Regional Commission’s coal counties of Southeast Kentucky. The inventory will help launch reclamation efforts and tourism activities related to the region’s rich coal mining heritage.
  • The Harlan County River Ramp project was selected to receive $376,000 that will construct nine ramps for canoe and kayak access into the Cumberland River and two dock ramps at Cranks and Highsplint lakes for recreation and fishing.
  • Mine Made Adventures in Knott County was selected to receive $1.5 million to expand and develop the park. The project will include campground sites, cabins, and a multi-use building. The newly developed park will serve as a trailhead for hundreds of miles of interconnected, multi-purpose trails.
  • The South Fork Elk View Campground in Breathitt County was selected to receive $1.345 million to continue development of the campground and recreation opportunities.

Energy and Environment Cabinet Secretary Charles Snavely said $25 million was available for 2019 grants and that over $135 million in projects was submitted to the Cabinet.  “While we would have liked to fund them all, we feel great about the projects that will go forward and contribute to the economic rebuilding of Eastern Kentucky,” Sec. Snavely said.

The $2 million Martin County Water District and the Clay County Impact Outdoor Adventures projects have been approved by the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation Enforcement (OSMRE). The others are pending final approval.

The AML Pilot Program, funded through OSMRE, is a program administered by the Energy and Environment Cabinet’s Division of Abandoned Mine Lands with assistance from the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development, the Department for Local Government, and the SOAR Initiative in Eastern Kentucky.

###

Editors: Additional quotes from state legislators and county judge executives from among the 14 counties that have been awarded projects can be found here.